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The Snows Of Kilimanjaro By Ernest Hemingway

.. aps the most obvious occurrence of symbols is that of the different animals. The different types of animals represent both the type of person Harry wishes to be, and the type of person he actually is. First is the leopard, it represents all that he has not accomplished. The leopard, being the fastest land animal has mastered his surroundings and accomplished greatness.

Harrys quest for excellence in his writing is shown throughout the story, this is directly correrlery to the great skill and dominance of the leopard of his kingdom. Harry strives to be like the leopard and accomplish greatness, but because of his blaming of others, he falls short. He is more comparable to that of the hyena. The hyena is a scavenging animal, dirty and sneaky. Harry is like the hyena in that he scavenges off the women in his life. He does not care about them; he only cares about what they might supply him with.

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In the story, the woman goes off to kill a piece of meat (10). Secondly, Hemingway also uses foreshadowing to help develop the theme. The first thing we read about it the dead leopard, leading the reader to think of death. Then as the story progresses the reader reads of the huge, filthy birds, and how they are slowly progressing closer and closer just like the death approaching Harry.After analyzing how the authors background, the plot, the characterization, and the literary devices contribute to the development of the theme The Snows of Kilimanjaro, one understands why this story rates high on the literary scale of value. One reason that this story rates high is that it fully achieves its purpose. The story achieves its purpose by the use of different writing skills and techniques. Hemingway uses not only his great analytical mind, bus draws upon his own experiences in life.

His travels to Africa, and his troubled past with women, are both shown to detail in this writing. Hemingway then develops his theme by using the internal conflicts of the characters, and through the development of conflict introduces a believable plot. The most important way he develops the theme is by using symbolism. From the start, Hemingway is using symbols, and in every turning point, from the vultures introducing the death to the hyena bringing it in the end the story uses symbols. His use of symbolism is a contribution to the characters, and the overall readability of the story.

Secondly, another reason this story rates high is that it has a significant purpose. Hemingway in writing The Snows of Kilimanjaro fulfils the purpose of entertaining, and entertainment with a deaper side it makes the reader think about life.He not only keeps the reader reading, but makes the reader think why or what made the character do this. This background together with a believable plot, convincing characterization, and important literary devices enables Ernest Hemingway in The Snows of Kilimanjaro to develop the theme that a person should neither waste the gifts he holds nor lead his life taking advantage of others.Annotated BibliographyBaker, Carlos. The Slopes of Kilimanjaro Ernest Hemingway A Life Story. New York: Scribners, 1969. Baker discusses Hemingways determination to produce as much quality work as possible.

Hemingway after suffering from insomnia and wild mood swings decides to write less, but more quality. Hemingway also had a fear of dying without finishing a work, and could well express the feelings of Harry in The Snows of Kilimanjaro. Nahal, Chaman. The Short Stories The Narrative Pattern in Ernest Hemingways Fiction. Madison: Fairleigh, 1971. 80-119.

Chaman points out that in The Snows of Kilimanjaro the different uses of writing style. Harry the dying hunter has flashbacks describing exciting events that have happened to him in his past adventures. Chaman goes on to point out that although these seem like flashbacks to the reader, they are very real moments to Harry.Plimpton, George. An Interview with Ernest Hemingway Hemingway and His Critics. Ed. Carlos Baker.

New York: Hill, 1961. This interview, conducted by Pilmpton with Hemingway, discusses some Hemingways influences on his writings. Hemingway states that in The Snows of Kilimanjaro that he was drawing on his knowledge and memory of his last hunting trip to Africa, and trying to convey the feelings felt while on his trips. It is evident in this interview that Hemingway is extremely dedicated in trying to make his writings as enjoyable and meaning as possible.Shuman, R. Baird.

Ernest Hemingway. Magills Survey of American Literature. Ed. Frank N. Magill. Vol.

3. New York: Marshall, 1991. Baird discusses the life of Hemingway, beginning with his birthplace and ending with the taking of his own life. Hemingway was well versed in the finer things in life with his mothers teachings but much preferred hunting and more masculine activities with his father. Another important influence in his writings is his experiences on great expeditions to Africa.Watts, Emily S. Iconography..

Ernest Hemingway and the Arts. Chicago: Illinois P, 1971. 51-95. Watts explains that Hemingway does not write much on the topic of suicide. One might think this would be a large subject in his stories, but he mentions suicide only briefly in one story. Although Harry in The Snows of Kilimanjaro does die, he has little choice in the manner.Works CitedBaker, Carlos.

The Slopes of Kilimanjaro. Ernest Hemingway A Life Story. New York: Scribners, 1969.Hemingway, Ernest. The Snows of Kilimanjaro. The Snows of Kilimanjaro and Other Stories.

New York: Scribners, 1970.Nahal, Chaman. The Short Stories. The Narrative Pattern in Ernest Hemingways Fiction. Madison: Fairleigh, 1971. Plimpton, George. An Interview with Ernest Hemingway. Hemingway and His Critics.

Ed. Carlos Baker. New York: Hill, 1961. Shuman, R. Baird.

Ernest Hemingway. Magills Survey of American Literature. Ed. Frank N. Magill. Vol.

3. New York: Marshall, 1991. Watts, Emily S. Iconography and technical expression: the agony of man. Ernest Hemingway and the Arts.

Chicago: Illinois P, 1971. English Essays.

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